All posts by Matthew Loftus

Matthew Loftus teaches and practices Family Medicine in Baltimore and East Africa. His work has been featured in Christianity Today, Comment, & First Things and he is a regular contributor for Christ and Pop Culture. You can learn more about his work and writing at www.MatthewAndMaggie.org

can evangelicalism’s corpse be revived?

Alan Jacobs has a grim prediction for the future of evangelicalism: There will of course continue to be vibrant congregations that define themselves as evangelical, but fewer and fewer as the years go by, I think. Most churches that would...

/ February 16, 2018

questioning brain death

This devastating story about Jahi McMath, a young woman who suffered a terrible complication of surgery (and might not have had she received closer attention) is worth reading in and of itself, but the questions it raises about the commonly...

/ February 15, 2018

that’s how all good comedies go

Ash Wednesday and Valentine’s Day fall on the same day this year, and Barbara McClay has some good thoughts on the matter: If Valentine’s Day is about the incommensurability of feeling and gesture, Ash Wednesday presents us with the ultimate...

/ February 14, 2018

Song Post: “Mary Consoles Eve”, Rain for Roots

I have written before about Rain For Roots’ album Waiting Songs, but I just have to recommend it again. [I was originally hoping to publish this during Advent but didn’t. It’s still a great year-round record.] Yes, it is technically categorized...

/ February 13, 2018

EMRs are designed for billing, not for retaining information

The dirty secret of all electronic medical records (EMRs) is this: they are not primarily designed to help doctors record, review, or share information about their patients. No, they are primarily designed to capture the data necessary to submit bills to...

/ February 12, 2018

follow the money, asthma prevention edition

The Washington Post explains why prevention gets shafted when it comes to treating chronic diseases like asthma: Both [major teaching hospitals in Baltimore] receive massive tax breaks in return for providing “community benefit,” a poorly defined federal requirement that they...

/ February 9, 2018

tara isabella burton, “the destroyer”

Tara Isabella Burton is one of the sharpest religion writers out there (here’s her Vox page), but she’s also a damn good fiction writer. I have longed for years to say, at year’s end, that I have read a novel...

/ February 8, 2018

my neighbor totoro

We just watched the movie My Neighbor Totoro for the first time a few months ago, and Lauren Wilford describes why it’s so great: All this may make it sound like I’m making an “eat your vegetables” argument for watching My...

/ February 7, 2018

science should be more political, not less

I just came upon Ari Schulman’s excellent essay in The Hedgehog Review about trying to make science less political: What we need is not a depoliticized science but a more political science—that is, a science unembarrassed about the legitimate role of politics in...

/ February 6, 2018

farewell to facebook

For years, Zuckerberg and Facebook have tromped through the technology landscape and demolished everything that stood in the way. This was done without any reprisal, without any consequence. In fact, each time the company destroyed a competitor, or found a...

/ February 5, 2018