loving those who would throw stones at us

I have always savored Wesley Hill’s love for the Gospel; his first book, Washed and Waiting, is just full of it, which is why it’s a great book to read even if you don’t care a bit about the homosexuality debate....

/ August 2, 2018

nonstandard patients, nonstandard doctors, nonstandard procedures

This reflection from Leah Libresco about her unfortunate experience of ectopic pregnancy and her deviation from the standard procedure is worth reading. She describes being offered “the standard of reproductive care”, which is basically a medication abortion. While this course...

/ August 1, 2018

community impact

When I was in college, I spent three summers living in Kenya and working in Kibera, an urban slum that is home to over a million people. It was there that I first felt called to long-term cross-cultural work, worked...

/ July 31, 2018

from indifference to sabotage

Jon Ward has written an insightful piece about America’s Supreme Court-centric culture war and what has been lost by what we have supposedly gained: But while it’s true that conservative positions on social issues are often portrayed, inaccurately, as reflecting...

/ July 30, 2018

flourishing and paid family leave

The Families Valued initiative of the Center for Public Justice has just released their new report on paid family leave, and I have some thoughts about it over on the main page. I think they make a pretty solid argument...

/ July 24, 2018

“the patient in the hospital bed is just the icon”

Abraham Verghese has a moving and pointed reflection about the ubiquity of technology in the hospital: When students arrive on the wards full time, white coats packed with the aforementioned instruments, measuring tape, tuning fork, flashlight and Snellen eye chart,...

/ July 23, 2018

transitional justice for Jim Crow

Decades after the Civil Rights Act and the end of Jim Crow, it’s clear that American attempts to reckon with racial injustices have been insufficient. But what could we have done — or do — differently? Anthony Bradley has a...

/ July 20, 2018

desire like dynamite

This op-ed from the New York Times about raising a child in a world facing environmental crisis is moving, even if you disagree with its premises: Living ethically means understanding that our actions have consequences, taking responsibility for how those...

/ July 19, 2018

poverty of imagination

I mentioned my Comment review of Jamil Jivani’s debut book Why Young Men? before, and he’s done a follow-up interview with the associated Convivium: One of the things I explore in the book – which is a pretty defining part of...

/ July 18, 2018

the elephant curve

Here’s a fun one from John Lancester at the London Review of Books: The economist who has done more in this field than anyone else, Branko Milanović, has a wonderful graph that illustrates the point about the relative outcomes for...

/ July 17, 2018