science should be more political, not less

I just came upon Ari Schulman’s excellent essay in The Hedgehog Review about trying to make science less political: What we need is not a depoliticized science but a more political science—that is, a science unembarrassed about the legitimate role of politics in...

/ February 6, 2018

farewell to facebook

For years, Zuckerberg and Facebook have tromped through the technology landscape and demolished everything that stood in the way. This was done without any reprisal, without any consequence. In fact, each time the company destroyed a competitor, or found a...

/ February 5, 2018

choosing our limitations

Andrew Russell has a fine piece at The Rabbit Room on limitations and our recent infatuation with “community”: if we look at the ways in which we’re currently trying to “live in community,” we’ll discover that we’re attempting to get...

/ February 2, 2018

How the plea deal sausage gets made

Justin Fenton has a great story from a few months ago exploring how plea deals happen in Baltimore City: Ninety-three percent of felony convictions in Baltimore are the result of plea deals — and some three-quarters of them are taken...

/ February 1, 2018

Andrew Osenga, “The Painted Desert”

This year, I’m hoping to keep this blog more active with short posts about stories and essays I’ve been reading, but I also want to share more music. I love writing and listening to music and there’s a lot of...

/ January 31, 2018

pro-life, anti-abortion, and a consistent ethic of anything

I’ve gotten a lot of responses to my post on the main site from the other day, specifically questioning the idea that “pro-life” ought to be circumscribed to mean only anti-abortion policies. My main points (which I would still consider...

/ January 8, 2018

what about Christian healthcare sharing ministries?

I get asked fairly frequently for my opinion about Christian healthcare sharing ministries. I’ve not had very many patients who use them, so I don’t have a lot of experience from the provider side. However, my wife and I used...

/ October 17, 2017

letting dying people die is not the same as killing them

Ian Tuttle asks some very good ethical questions in the case of Charlie Gard, the British infant with a rare mitochondrial disease whose parents have been forbidden by the courts from taking their child to the U.S. for experimental treatment:...

/ June 30, 2017

the insanity of autonomy

Kate Shellnutt asked wrote a piece in Christianity Today discussing a new Gallup poll suggesting that Americans are getting more liberal in their social views: The church today finds itself in a precarious position, as an ethical shift pushes public...

/ May 26, 2017

The healthcare problem markets and charity can’t fix

My internet friend Ian Barrs, a conservative dude who originally hails from the UK, has written a moving post about Medicaid and his son Hugh: I’ll be honest: when I read of “per capita limits on MedicAid spending”, I ask...

/ May 12, 2017