Category: Economics

“has anyone asked working-class families if being sucked into a frantically achievement-obsessed rat race is a benefaction they are interested in?”

This essay from Helen Andrews is just too enjoyable not to share: Does Currid-Halkett have anything bad to say about the new elite? She has just one complaint, which she repeats again and again whenever she senses that she is sounding too...

/ October 2, 2018

the inequality keeps growing and growing and growing

I have really been appreciating Alec MacGillis’ careful reporting on the places that have been left behind in our current economy, and this ProPublica report from Dayton, Ohio (that also frequently references Baltimore, another struggling place) is no exception: In...

/ October 1, 2018

men not at work

Senator Mike Lee’s office has been doing fantastic work investigating America’s declining social capital, and this report on men out of the workforce has a lot to chew on: We confirm research by other scholars that a large number of...

/ September 26, 2018

Alma Ata at 40

Yesterday was the 40th anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration (PDF) — the landmark 1978 World Health Organization statement by 134 countries affirming the vital role of primary health care. This article explains why it’s so important to still focus on...

/ September 13, 2018

the necessity and history of corporate social responsbility

I very much look forward to reading Kyle Edward Williams’ thesis on corporate social responsibility whenever it comes out. For now, he’s got a great piece in the Washington Post on Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s plan to bring responsibility back to corporate...

/ September 3, 2018

the devil in the details

Jeffrey Bilbro has an excellent essay ruminating on the question of GMOs in the New Jerusalem, inspired by Abigail Murrish’s thoughts at Christianity Today on the same. Here’s Murrish: if the New Jerusalem will have as-yet-unseen cultural diversity—the best of what...

/ August 28, 2018

flourishing and paid family leave

The Families Valued initiative of the Center for Public Justice has just released their new report on paid family leave, and I have some thoughts about it over on the main page. I think they make a pretty solid argument...

/ July 24, 2018

poverty of imagination

I mentioned my Comment review of Jamil Jivani’s debut book Why Young Men? before, and he’s done a follow-up interview with the associated Convivium: One of the things I explore in the book – which is a pretty defining part of...

/ July 18, 2018

the elephant curve

Here’s a fun one from John Lancester at the London Review of Books: The economist who has done more in this field than anyone else, Branko Milanović, has a wonderful graph that illustrates the point about the relative outcomes for...

/ July 17, 2018

there aren’t good short-term fixes for migration, either

Last week I highlighted a really good article about the long-term migration problem that the world is facing. Here is more evidence from The Atlantic that things aren’t holding in the short-term, either: When I asked immigration experts this week...

/ July 5, 2018