All posts by Matthew Loftus

Matthew Loftus teaches and practices Family Medicine in Baltimore and East Africa. His work has been featured in Christianity Today, Comment, & First Things and he is a regular contributor for Christ and Pop Culture. You can learn more about his work and writing at www.MatthewAndMaggie.org

desire like dynamite

This op-ed from the New York Times about raising a child in a world facing environmental crisis is moving, even if you disagree with its premises: Living ethically means understanding that our actions have consequences, taking responsibility for how those...

/ July 19, 2018

poverty of imagination

I mentioned my Comment review of Jamil Jivani’s debut book Why Young Men? before, and he’s done a follow-up interview with the associated Convivium: One of the things I explore in the book – which is a pretty defining part of...

/ July 18, 2018

the elephant curve

Here’s a fun one from John Lancester at the London Review of Books: The economist who has done more in this field than anyone else, Branko Milanović, has a wonderful graph that illustrates the point about the relative outcomes for...

/ July 17, 2018

2 gilead 2 handle

I very much enjoyed reading this essay by Alissa Wilkinson about two fictional places called Gilead: the eponymous town in Marilynne Robinson’s book Gilead and the nation run by a pseudo-Christian cult in Margaret Atwood’s book The Handmaid’s Tale. The latter, recently...

/ July 16, 2018

“Let Me Stand”

This is a tremendous essay on one victim of the opioid crisis, as narrated by her brother: Several years ago, I felt convicted to ask Tricia for forgiveness. She was in jail at the time. By appearances, I was a...

/ July 12, 2018

what if people want what’s bad?

This The New Atlantis article about Google, its power, and its struggles with regulation is very interesting. But the ending is perhaps the most troubling: Google links to a December 2016 Fortune article that explains, “Querying the search engine for ‘did the Holocaust happen’...

/ July 11, 2018

the enduring absurdity of race

This essay by W. Ralph Eubanks is a good introduction to the challenges of race’s enduring power in America: Race is an absurdity, having long ago been discredited as a valid biological category and, in the Brown decision, a defensible legal one....

/ July 10, 2018

“I surely am the degradedest woman that ever lived.”

I was delighted to find that one of my all-time favorite short stories (surpassed only by “Watch With Me”, the most profound exploration of community and mental illness I have read), “A Half-Pint of Old Darling” by Wendell Berry, is...

/ July 9, 2018

learning from other countries about community health workers

One of my favorite hobbyhorses is community health workers, so I’m delighted to see that someone is trying to study how we might more broadly implement them in the US: The task force says that involving community representatives in the...

/ July 6, 2018

there aren’t good short-term fixes for migration, either

Last week I highlighted a really good article about the long-term migration problem that the world is facing. Here is more evidence from The Atlantic that things aren’t holding in the short-term, either: When I asked immigration experts this week...

/ July 5, 2018